Reimagining Welfare (Part 2 of 2)

Mar 5, 2019Commentary, Safety Net

CEO Paul Mero wrote a commentary for Utah Politico Hub (second part) outlining some principles and guidelines for a more effective approach to welfare and the safety net. Here’s an excerpt:

Community-centered, government-supported. . . .

Shifting the burden of welfare from recipient to provider – from entitlement to obligation – is the better way. Instead of forcing “rights” down Utah’s throat, a better way is to remind Utahns of their values and moral obligation to care for our neighbors in need. The opportunity for exponential progress toward political transcendence becomes immediately clear.

We would no longer be incentivized to petition government. The new incentive would be to petition hearts and minds. Instead of a culture of political contention, every effort would be turned to simply serving the actual and individual needs of every Utahn. No more haves and have nots because our values tell us to see others as we see ourselves. We would become of one mind and one heart – politically transcendent.

So, how do we make this important shift from recipient to provider, from entitlement to obligation? The good news is that once we break free from our restrictive ideologies, everything is possible. Our societal objective would become the welfare and wellbeing of everyone, not simply gaining a new benefit for a select few. Every commensurate, decent and humane personal and societal value would be in play, not just the values we pit against each other. Our goal becomes the dignity, happiness and prosperity of all Utahns. We are free to reimagine welfare.

You can read Part 1 here.

You can read Part 2 here.

Read More

Reimagining Welfare (Part 1 of 2)

Reimagining Welfare (Part 1 of 2)

CEO Paul Mero wrote a commentary for Utah Politico Hub regarding the importance of having an effective welfare safety net. He also added, "Caring for our neighbors in need is the only way we’ll achieve a higher sense of self, community, and democracy – a transcendent...

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